Human language

Scottish Rite’s App State donation exceeds $2 million

BOONE, North Carolina — For more than 60 years, Appalachian State University has enjoyed the continued support of Scottish Rite organizations in North Carolina. The contributions, which collectively total more than $2 million, have supported clinics, scholarships and programs related to communication disorders and learning to read.

“These clinics are vital resources where community members can receive much-needed help locally, and they also serve as learning labs where our students gain hands-on experience.”

Jane Barghothi, App State Vice Chancellor of University Advancement

Scottish Rite Masons – one of many groups that are part of the worldwide brotherhood known as Freemasonry – have long been committed to helping children with language impairments through their organization RiteCare, that supports clinics and outreach efforts, such as those found at App State.

Donations from organizations to the university were largely directed to the Scottish Rite Communication Disorders Clinic Charles and Geneva Scott and the Anderson Reading Clinicand also fund postgraduate scholarships in the Beaver College of Health Sciences and Reich College of Education.

“We are deeply grateful to these organizations for their continued generosity,” said Jane Barghothi, Vice Chancellor of University Advancement at App State. “These clinics are vital resources where community members can receive much-needed help locally, and they also serve as learning labs where our students gain hands-on experience.”

App State alumnus Alex Edmisten ’03 defends App State with NC RiteCare. He said the university’s clinics provide “incredible services” for children with language and reading disabilities, regardless of their family’s ability to pay.

With support from the Scottish Rite, App State clinics will continue to educate and prepare some of the brightest speech therapists and teachers, all of whom will make a difference in children’s lives, Edmisten said.

Develop philanthropy in all organizations

The assumption of the state of application by the Scottish Rite mainly passed through the NC Scottish Rite Masonic Foundation and the Hillery H. Rink Jr. Fund of Scottish Rite of Winston-Salem. Organizations contributed to the following areas at App State:

It should be noted that a bequest made by Hillery Hudson Rink Jr. allowed the Winston-Salem Scottish Rite to provide $175,000 to App State. The funds were earmarked for the purchase of equipment and scholarships for the university’s Communication Disorders Clinic, Anderson Reading Clinic and Middle Fork Academy, as well as to help establish the App State academy in Elkin.

Treating Communication Disorders

According to the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, more than half of American children between the ages of 3 and 17 with voice, speech, language, or swallowing disorders have received intervention services during of the past year, which highlights the need for these services to be available in the local area.

App State’s Communication Disorders Clinic, which was established in 1968, operates as a nonprofit unit within Beaver College of Health Sciences. Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders.

The clinic offers services for infants, children, adolescents and adults in the areas of speech therapy and audiology. In 2021, the clinic served over 500 patients, including 80 children. It also serves as a training center for graduate students of the university master’s program in speech therapy.

Appalachian State University has received more than $2 million from Scottish Rite organizations to support clinics, scholarships, and programs related to communication disorders and reading instruction, including donations to the Charles and Geneva Scott Scottish Rite Communication Disorders Clinic and at the Anderson Reading Clinic. Sarah Young ’15, clinical educator and speech pathologist at the Communication Disorders Clinic, far right, and Maggie McCabe ’21 – graduate student in speech-language pathology at the time of the photo – use a video laryngostroboscopy to examine a patient’s larynx. Photo by Marie Freeman

Youth Literacy

The Anderson Reading Clinic — which was established in the mid-1950s and named for Pat A. Anderson in 2015 — helps more than 100 children each year.

The need for reading clinics is demonstrated across the country. According to the National Assessment of Educational Progress, 65% of fourth graders in the United States do not read at a proficient level.

App State’s clinic is the only university-based clinic in North Carolina that provides year-round teacher training and diagnostic and remedial reading services to children in the community.

Undergraduate and graduate students at App State work directly with children in the clinic, under the supervision of faculty members.

A mountain connection

Edmisten helped continue the decades-long relationship between Scottish Rite and App State, according to Barghothi.

“I couldn’t be more proud to be a mountaineer and involved in our RiteCare clinics,” said Edmisten.

He and his wife, Crystal, have established legacy endowments that will support the Anderson Reading Clinic and the Communication Disorders Clinic in perpetuity. Their daughter, Lydia, hopes to attend App State and study at Beaver College of Health Sciences.

Edmisten, who got a bachelor’s degree in communication, public relations of App State, is president of public relations for the Orient of North Carolina Scottish Rite and president of the Ashe Shrine Club. He has over 20 years of experience as an insurance consultant and insurance agency sales trainer for companies including LifeStore Insurance, Blue Cross NC and Farm Bureau.

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Each year, App State responds to the critical needs of the university. These needs are as diverse as providing scholarships for students to attend App State, to ensuring our faculty and classrooms are empowered to train 21st century professionals. Every donation to the university has the power to ensure the App State Experience for our students and make a difference.

Anderson Reading Clinic

The Anderson Reading Clinic, under the direction of Dr. Devery Ward, provides direct services to children with reading problems. Each child receives approximately 15 hours of individual instruction in reading and writing. The clinic, based on the Appalachian campus, operated additional off-campus branches in Davie County, Burke County, and Yadkin County. An important function of the reading clinic is to train expert reading teachers to work in public schools.

Appalachian Communication Disorders Clinic

The Charles E. and Geneva S. Scott Scottish Rite Communication Disorders Clinic at Appalachian State University, established in 1968, operates as a non-profit unit housed within the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders from Beaver College of Health Sciences. The clinic serves as a training center for graduating students from the Appalachian Speech-Language Pathology Program, providing hands-on clinical learning experiences. It also offers prevention, assessment and treatment services in the areas of speech, language, swallowing and hearing disorders for children, adolescents and adults with communication disorders in the region.

3-Year-Old Finds His Voice Thanks to App State's Communication Disorders Clinic

July 17, 2020

Working with speech-language pathologists at the Appalachian Communication Disorders Clinic, a 3-year-old child diagnosed with severe childhood apraxia of speech is learning to communicate. Speech therapy gave her the ability to call her mother “Mom” for the first time.

About the Appalachian Communication Disorders Clinic

The Charles E. and Geneva S. Scott Scottish Rite Communication Disorders Clinic at Appalachian State University, established in 1968, operates as a non-profit unit housed within the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders from Beaver College of Health Sciences. The clinic serves as a training center for graduating students from the Appalachian Speech-Language Pathology Program, providing hands-on clinical learning experiences. It also offers prevention, assessment and treatment services in the areas of speech, language, swallowing and hearing disorders for children, adolescents and adults with communication disorders in the region. Learn more about https://cdclinic.appstate.edu.

About Beaver College of Health Sciences

The Beaver College of Health Sciences (BCHS) at Appalachian State University, opened in 2010, is transforming the health and quality of life of the communities it serves through interprofessional collaboration and innovation in teaching, learning, and health. scholarship, services and clinical outreach. BCHS offers nine undergraduate degree programs and seven graduate degree programs, which are organized into six departments: Communication Sciences and Disorders; Health and Exercise Sciences; Feeding with milk; nutrition and health care management; leisure management and physical education; and social work. The college’s academic programs are located at the Holmes Convocation Center on App State’s main campus and at the Leon Levine Hall of Health Sciences, a 203,000 square foot state-of-the-art facility that is the cornerstone of the Wellness District. Additionally, the college supports the Blue Cross NC Institute for Health and Human Services and maintains collaborative partnerships with the Physician Assistant Program at Wake Forest School of Medicine, the Appalachian Regional Health System, and many other organizations in health. Learn more about https://healthsciences.appstate.edu.

About the Reich College of Education

Appalachian State University offers one of the largest undergraduate teacher preparation programs in North Carolina, graduating approximately 500 teachers annually. The Reich College of Education enrolls more than 2,000 students in its bachelor’s, master’s, education specialization, and doctoral programs. With so many teacher education graduates working in the state, there is at least one RCOE graduate teaching in every county in North Carolina. Learn more about https://rcoe.appstate.edu.

About Appalachian State University

As the premier public undergraduate institution in the state of North Carolina, Appalachian State University prepares students to lead meaningful lives as global citizens who understand and take responsibility for creating a future sustainable for all. The Appalachian Experience promotes a spirit of inclusion that brings people together in inspiring ways to gain and create knowledge, to grow holistically, to act with passion and purpose, and to embrace diversity and difference. Located in the Blue Ridge Mountains, Appalachian is one of 17 campuses in the University of North Carolina system. Appalachia is home to over 20,000 students, has a low student-faculty ratio, and offers over 150 undergraduate and graduate majors.